HI :D
bofransson:

John Sloan (1871–1951), The City from Greenwich Village, 1922

bofransson:

John Sloan (1871–1951), The City from Greenwich Village, 1922

chocolate-time-machine:

cryptid-creations:

Day 597. Kanto 134 by Cryptid-Creations

perfect

bemusedlybespectacled:

do you ever think about the judges for the triwizard tournament trying to figure out who to kidnap for the second task

like they’re all just sitting in dumbledore’s office and karkaroff goes “well word on the street says that krum has a crush on that granger girl”

"damn," says dumbledore, "I wanted harry to rescue her. well, what about the delightful miss chang?"

"no," says bagman, "we’ve got her down for diggory"

"stop sinking my ships," says dumbledore

pine-cypress:

x-file:

catazoid:

As promised, here are some pictures of Lyalya’s first walk outside! Look at the bushy little squirrel tail :D the sandpit was her favorite spot! She was extremely excited and threw sand all over the place

this is a fucking squirrel. this is a fucking squirrel with a cat’s head. who is responsible for this

my cousin has two of these and they’re incredible

neutralize:

cherryseltzer:

to all young tumblr people, i am old enough that my friends and peers are divorced, have children, are in AA, etc. and they all still watch ‘adventure time’ and take 100 selfies a day and overdraft their bank accounts and stuff. so don’t worry, you never have…

moustacherlock:

dick-of-darkness:

dumbpointyanimeshades:

whys tumblr always so dead on sundays

no post on sundays

image

spacehangout:

That Indescribable Feeling You get When You Gaze Back at Earth from Space
Seeing our home planet from space is one of those self-reflective experiences, like seeing yourself in a picture, or hearing your voice on tape. It tells you something about yourself from outside of yourself. It is an experience that changes your understanding of the world and your place in it.
This phenomenon is best illustrated by the words of space travelers who, upon reaching orbit, have gazed back at Earth and felt the profound impact of viewing the planet in its entirety.
Neil Armstrong, the first person to step foot on the Moon, described the feeling of perspective he experienced when staring out at the Earth from the spacecraft window: “It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.”
William Anders (Apollo 8 mission), had this to say: “We came all this way to explore the Moon, and the most important thing is that we discovered the Earth.”
Frank Borman, Apollo 8 commander, said, “The view of the Earth from the Moon fascinated me — a small disk, 240,000 miles away… Raging nationalistic interests, famines, wars, pestilence don’t show from that distance.”
Alan Shepard, commander of the Apollo 14 mission, the eighth manned mission to the Moon, said of the experience of seeing the home planet in its entirety, “If somebody had said before the flight, ‘Are you going to get carried away looking at the Earth from the Moon?’ I would have said, ‘No, no way.’ But yet when I first looked back at the Earth, standing on the Moon, I cried!”
Credit: NASA

spacehangout:

That Indescribable Feeling You get When You Gaze Back at Earth from Space

Seeing our home planet from space is one of those self-reflective experiences, like seeing yourself in a picture, or hearing your voice on tape. It tells you something about yourself from outside of yourself. It is an experience that changes your understanding of the world and your place in it.

This phenomenon is best illustrated by the words of space travelers who, upon reaching orbit, have gazed back at Earth and felt the profound impact of viewing the planet in its entirety.

Neil Armstrong, the first person to step foot on the Moon, described the feeling of perspective he experienced when staring out at the Earth from the spacecraft window: “It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.”

William Anders (Apollo 8 mission), had this to say: “We came all this way to explore the Moon, and the most important thing is that we discovered the Earth.”

Frank Borman, Apollo 8 commander, said, “The view of the Earth from the Moon fascinated me — a small disk, 240,000 miles away… Raging nationalistic interests, famines, wars, pestilence don’t show from that distance.”

Alan Shepard, commander of the Apollo 14 mission, the eighth manned mission to the Moon, said of the experience of seeing the home planet in its entirety, “If somebody had said before the flight, ‘Are you going to get carried away looking at the Earth from the Moon?’ I would have said, ‘No, no way.’ But yet when I first looked back at the Earth, standing on the Moon, I cried!”

Credit: NASA

thenimbus:

dat small meow

pokebae:

when u realize u sent an important text to the wrong person

image